HAYLEY'S WORLD

More Clam Dunk Phone Wallpapers!

More Clam Dunk Phone Wallpapers!

Curating your lock screen can be like curating your wardrobe, it's all about expressing yourself and hopefully picking something you won't get sick of fast. Well luckily for you we have some amazing eye-catching options for you to choose from, and possibly match your outfit too...
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Kardinal 4 Mayor: Drake, Kawhi, and How to Be A Visionary with Toronto Hip Hop’s Elder Statesman

Kardinal 4 Mayor: Drake, Kawhi, and How to Be A Visionary with Toronto Hip Hop’s Elder Statesman

Full disclosure, I am a Kardinal Offishall fanboy, and have been since high school, so some hyperbole might infiltrate this introduction, but I feel like I can safely say without exaggeration that there wouldn’t be a Drake as we know him without Kardinal.  While I’m at it, we might never have collectively adopted T.Dot as a nickname for Toronto, Sean Paul might not have blown up when he did and the world certainly wouldn’t know as much about the ‘Screwface Capital’ as they do.

Kardinal kicked down the door for hip hop in Canada, and did so with a unique blend of charisma, style, bravado, and humility that has yet to be duplicated. He personified the polite chip we have on our  collective shoulder as Canadians who are sick of explaining that we have a summer, don’t ice skate to school, and aren’t just Americans with funny accents. His track, ‘BaKardi Slang’ properly introduced the world of hip hop to Toronto and by the time his song ‘Dangerous’ made it all the way to the top of Billboard’s Hot 100, Kardinal had worked with everyone from the Wu-Tang Clan, to Pharrell, to Pusha T, to Busta Rhymes, to Timbaland.  He even appeared alongside Lady Gaga on the Red One Remix of ‘Just Dance’ from her limited edition Hitmixes album. Bradley Cooper, eat your heart out.

Along with Vince Carter he was part of the period in the early 2000s when people started paying attention to Toronto as a uniquely diverse hub of activity, and a burgeoning world power in terms of influencing global popular culture. Today he is the Senior Director of Urban A&R at Universal Music, and continues to perform, DJ, host and educate all while ensuring his family comes first. Kardinal came through HE HQ in downtown Toronto and sat down for an interview as well as modelling some pieces from our SS19 collection, Clam Dunk Surf Club, and our collab with fellow Toronto brand, Elsaesser x Get Fresh Company.

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Clam Dunk Phone Wallpapers!

Clam Dunk Phone Wallpapers!

Playing on the concept of the parallel consumerism of the fashion and food industries, Clam Dunk Surf Club finds itself in the fictional city of Trash Cove, USA. Hayley was inspired by the concept of trying to be conscious in an industry that is propped up by over-consumption. Combining food-inspired imagery with nods to consumerism, Clam Dunk prints present a visual narrative against thoughtless consumption.
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Why NBA Players Are The New Style Icons

Why NBA Players Are The New Style Icons

Over the last couple years, the fashion industry has witnessed the rise of streetwear and the convergence of popular skate brands like Supreme and Palace with luxury fashion labels like Louis Vuitton and Comme des Garçons.  This has coincided with a re-emergence of sportswear stalwarts like Champion, Nike and Adidas and the canonization of a new batch of young, superstar designers like Jerry Lorenzo (Fear of God) and Virgil Abloh (Off-White, Louis Vuitton). Despite recent runway trends suggesting that more formal tailoring is making a comeback, the comfortable, oversized ‘anything goes’ streetwear aesthetic has been the prevailing force in millennial fashion of late. Young men are a driving market for cutting edge clothing for possibly the first time ever, there are low barriers to entry for emerging e-commerce brands and choreographed ‘fit pics’ dominate social media feeds.
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Dove Project #ShowUs

Dove Project #ShowUs

I am so excited to share a bit more about an amazing project I was a part of with Dove, Project #ShowUs. Growing up, I was always obsessed with fashion, poring over magazines for hours, never questioning the realities of the photo-shopped models I was seeing or the damaging stereotypes this was perpetuating. For a long time, I thought I was the one who was wrong, that I needed to change to be more like the models I saw in magazines, and never thought that I might be OK just the way I was, because everything was telling me otherwise.
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